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I’ve always said that registration should be like a first date, slowly introduce yourself, ask a few questions, get a response and ask a few more. Until both sides get where they want.

First impressions count.

Don’t  bombard your new user with anymore that 3-4 questions when first introducing your registration process. If you’re going to ask more than two pages of questions, add a progress bar to manage their expectations.

Why not try this? Break your offer into bite-sized chunks

Break your offer into bite-sized chunks

Break your offer into bite-sized chunks

Don’t get too personal

Ask for just what you need in order to create the account; you can always ask about other things later.

Ask for just what you need in order to create the account; you can always ask about other things later.

Ask for just what you need in order to create the account; you can always ask about other things later.

Don’t ask for personal information (e.g. date of birth) unless you really need it. Where regulations stipulate geo-location, ask just enough to create the account. For the UK, use postcode look-up. For international products, customise fields for that region.

Give meaningful feedback

For instance, an invalid username is entered, do not return the error message:

Please try again. Error code #10486
Specifically tailored inline messages that actually help the user

Specifically tailored inline messages that actually help the user

Specifically tailored inline messages that actually help the user continue with their registration is by far the preferred method. Help password selection by simply including “7-12 letters and numbers.” within the field. Simples!

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This is but a another contribution to the design community by spindlelegs. Please leave a content or message direct at info@spindlelegs.co.uk

©spindlelegs 2017