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As a UXer, I am aware of the agile concept, the Definition of Done (DoD). But how does it affect me is another question. Recently I have been invited to a couple of chats while looking at potential career opportunities, in one of them, one Dev Lead was interested in my DoD – so after, I decided I’d research, from a UX perspective, if this was something I should know as many projects fails because ‘done’ is poorly defined.

Having a clear DoD helps Scrum Teams work together more collaboratively, increases transparency, and ultimately results in the development of consistently higher quality software.

The general censuses is three-part. First, code is produced or completed, second code is commented, and lastly code is checked in. This is a very simple DoD, but it works. It works for Dev Teams, but how does the UXer fit into this?

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It has been proposed that approval by Product Owner is the third step, but it doesn’t necessarily mean styled, so my thoughts would be that un-styled functionality is a big ask to sign off. Also, it doesn’t mean tested. It just means developed.

“DONE!” should mean shippable. I have heard the phrase “done done done”, this usually means it has been reviewed (both design review and code review) – and everything is tickety-bo. Sorry.

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This is very true for Dev teams, but what about UX teams – How would you define your DoD?